Equal Water

Fifteen liters of water are the minimum that a person needs to the day, according to United Nations. Each Spanish consumes near 300 liters and, in the United States, 400. Meanwhile, a person who lives in a exhausted country does not arrive at the ten daily liters. The access to the potable water is a fundamental right of the people and an essential element for the life. United Nations explain that there is more than 260 cross-border river basins and Lagos in the world that extend through territory of 145 countries, and cover half with the terrestrial surface of the planet. In addition, they are the great underground water tanks. Thus, there is sufficient fresh water to satisfy the human needs.

The world-wide population only depends on one hundredth part of 1% of the water of the world. The problem is in a little equitable distribution and the threat of the contamination. At present, more than 1,100 million people they do not have access to the potable water and 2,600 million do not have suitable systems of cleaning. In addition, every year they die near two million and average of people, the majority young, by diseases related to the bad conditions of the water and half of the beds of the hospitals worldwide is occupied by people who suffer diseases transmitted by the water, according to United Nations. With as simple measures as to teach the importance of washing the hands, they would be possible to be reduced until in a 45% the cases of diarrhoea in the world. The WHO has considered in 700 million annual dollars the possible gains of productivity derived from a reduction of the diarrhoea if, for 2015, it were reduced to half the proportion of people without access to the potable water and the cleaning. In the countries of the North, the panorama is very different.